Mì Hoành Thánh {Wonton Egg Noodle Soup}


Mì Hoành Thánh {Wonton Egg Noodle Soup}
Serves approximately 6

Ingredients:

1 medium sized yellow onion
2 inches fresh ginger
3 quarts chicken stock (or ½ chicken stock, ½ seafood stock if you have it)
1 ounce dried shiitake mushrooms
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
3 bulbs bok choy, quartered and washed (or Chinese broccoli)
24-30 shrimp and pork wontons
1 package Chinese egg noodles
1 pound Xá Xíu (char sui), sliced
½ cup sliced scallions
fresh cilantro
½ cup fried shallots
Sichuan chili oil

Place the onion directly on the gas stove grate. Over medium-low, cook and rotate the oven for about 5 minutes until the onion has evenly charred. Set aside. If you don’t have a gas stove, you can cut the oven in half and coat lightly in vegetable oil. Place on a baking sheet and char underneath the oven broiler. Repeat the same process with the ginger.

Pour the stock into a large pot and add the charred onion and ginger. Bring to a boil and lower to a simmer. Add shiitake mushrooms, soy sauce, fish sauce, sesame oil and peppercorns. Simmer for about 20 minutes.

While the stock simmer, bring another pot of water to boil. Add the bok choy and stir for a 45—60 seconds until it turns bright green. Using a large metal strainer or slotted spoon, remove and drain the bok choy. Set aside.

Using the same pot of boiling water, add the wontons in batches. Allow the wontons to cook for about 3-4 minutes or until the wrappers become translucent and the filling has cooked through. With the metal strainer or slotted spoon—remove, drain and set aside. Repeat until all the wontons are cooked.

Boil the egg noodles according to the package. Pour the noodles and water into a colander to drain. Rinse with cool water and shake to remove excess water.

Divide the noodles, bok choy, wontons and Xá Xíu amongst six bowls.

Taste the broth. Add additional soy or fish sauce as needed. Ladle the hot broth over each of the bowls. Top each with fresh scallions, cilantro, and fried shallots. Serve Sichuan chili oil on the side and enjoy!

Creative Commons License

The Culinary Chronicles and all Photography by Nam Nguyen are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.


Posted in <a href="https://tastestation.com/category/food-blog/" rel="category tag">Food Blog</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/category/license-creative-commons/" rel="category tag">License Creative Commons</a>Tagged <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/bok-choy/" rel="tag">bok choy</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/chicken-stock/" rel="tag">chicken stock</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/cilantro/" rel="tag">cilantro</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/egg-noodles/" rel="tag">egg noodles</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/fish-sauce/" rel="tag">fish sauce</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/ginger/" rel="tag">ginger</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/shrimp/" rel="tag">shrimp</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/soy-sauce/" rel="tag">soy sauce</a>, <a href="https://tastestation.com/tag/wonton/" rel="tag">wonton</a>

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